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What applications can correctly read RPT files produced via an export using Microsoft SQL Management Studio?
RPT is a primitive format and you're right it will be problematic if there are CRs in data (precisely because it's fixed so you can't do much about it). Why not consider a different format? Management studio has other options.
What would it take to manufacture a (Poincaré ball model of a) hyperbolic icosahedral honeycomb?
If you used SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) you should be able to make this but I can not be sure without the file. It will probably be quite expensive because it would need to be large. Technology nWith SLS a fine powder is sintered by a laser and the hardened powder bes the model. The remaining unsintered powder is then removed and presto you have your ball. The quick path to a definitive answer is to upload the model to or and see what they think(more on that rmendation below). In my opinion you could not make your ball with other technologies such as Zcorp Objet and stereolithography at the moment. These technologies would have issues with strength and support material removal. The parts would print but break in post processing. With SLS it should work but it would depend on the wall thickness of the individual branches. Wall thickness nWith SLS you can make wall thicknesses of .4mm but generally 1mm is a good minimum for small structural elements of a part. For larger branches and for overall support of your model you would need 2mm at minimum. The largest branches would need to be even thicker. Size and production nThe largest build volume of an SLS machine is 7 x 38 x 58mm for an Eosint p8 p76 or p7. These are rather rare so you'd have to find a service bureau that has deployed one of them. If you scale your model so that the thicknesses correspond to the above you should be able to see if it would fit in that machine or hopefully for your wallet into a smaller machine. If it would fit into a p1 at 2 x 25 x 33 you could use many more service bureaus and it would be significantly cheaper since the print time and volume of the part would be significantly less. Materialise and FKM have both the largest and smallest machines. There should be some others perhaps even in your area but these two could give you a price either way (NB I used to work for Materialise. But I operate always under the assumption if I were making this particular thing for myself which machine and which service would I use and try to give the best advice accordingly. If it were my new hip who would I pick to make it? italic I am of the opinion that italic n Materialise italic n FIT italic n CRP Technology italic n FKM italic n 3D RPT italic n Shapeways ((another former workplace)) italic n FCubic italic n Layerwise italic n and italic n Prometal italic n are all excellent services depending on the use case and part needed. With the proviso that Shapeways is a self service low cost provider and each of the others are technology and innovation leaders and the best at manufacturing and delivering expertise in their respective fields. italic So a blanket rmendation for 3D printing is cheap simple non critical part=Shapeways or Prometal. italic Difficult end part expertise pushing the envelope large scale manufacturing high volume manufacturing automotive or medical=FIT FKM 3D RPT Prometal Materialise Fcubic Layerwise or CRP. italic This list is not exhaustive since I don't have any experience with many undoubtedly excellent service bureaus out there but in my opinion these are the best 3D printing services bar none. If you do order from one of these do please say that I rmended them I'm looking to make a metal 3D printed watch band and case and could use the additional discount. italic Also there are also other SLS technologies and machines out there such as 3D Systems Sinterstations and sPro machines but at the risk of bing the only person working in 3D printing without a email address I prefer EOS because it is better and makes for higher definition and prettier parts). italic Issues with production nAnother issue to consider would be with the flexibility of the standard polyamide (PA) material used with SLS. This would mean that your part might sag under its own weight and not look very nice. Perhaps it would be possible to make it with PA but this would again depend on the wall thicknesses you need in order to print all the branches which would determine the size of part needed. A very big version of this would sag but if it would be smaller it will work. The service bureau should have people that can predict this for you. If the part might sag you could use Alumide a much stiffer material that is made by mixing the PA powder with aluminum powder. This should give it a nice space aged look. EOS CarbonMide is another possibility and would look awesome and GF or glass filled PA is also possible as is PEEK. These all will give a much higher stiffness to the final part than regular PA. Cost might be eye wateringingly wonderful for something to keep on your desk but then again I don't know how expensive your desk is. I also can't really predict price based on the image. It might be OK but an upload and some email correspondence with a service bureau will give you a definitive answer. Here are some movies that ex the technologyn n
The constant in money mgmt for traders seems to be compounded returns however what's best, adjusting investment amounts after each trade or in stages?
If you used SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) you should be able to make this but I can not be sure without the file. It will probably be quite expensive because it would need to be large. Technology nWith SLS a fine powder is sintered by a laser and the hardened powder bes the model. The remaining unsintered powder is then removed and presto you have your ball. The quick path to a definitive answer is to upload the model to or and see what they think(more on that rmendation below). In my opinion you could not make your ball with other technologies such as Zcorp Objet and stereolithography at the moment. These technologies would have issues with strength and support material removal. The parts would print but break in post processing. With SLS it should work but it would depend on the wall thickness of the individual branches. Wall thickness nWith SLS you can make wall thicknesses of .4mm but generally 1mm is a good minimum for small structural elements of a part. For larger branches and for overall support of your model you would need 2mm at minimum. The largest branches would need to be even thicker. Size and production nThe largest build volume of an SLS machine is 7 x 38 x 58mm for an Eosint p8 p76 or p7. These are rather rare so you'd have to find a service bureau that has deployed one of them. If you scale your model so that the thicknesses correspond to the above you should be able to see if it would fit in that machine or hopefully for your wallet into a smaller machine. If it would fit into a p1 at 2 x 25 x 33 you could use many more service bureaus and it would be significantly cheaper since the print time and volume of the part would be significantly less. Materialise and FKM have both the largest and smallest machines. There should be some others perhaps even in your area but these two could give you a price either way (NB I used to work for Materialise. But I operate always under the assumption if I were making this particular thing for myself which machine and which service would I use and try to give the best advice accordingly. If it were my new hip who would I pick to make it? italic I am of the opinion that italic n Materialise italic n FIT italic n CRP Technology italic n FKM italic n 3D RPT italic n Shapeways ((another former workplace)) italic n FCubic italic n Layerwise italic n and italic n Prometal italic n are all excellent services depending on the use case and part needed. With the proviso that Shapeways is a self service low cost provider and each of the others are technology and innovation leaders and the best at manufacturing and delivering expertise in their respective fields. italic So a blanket rmendation for 3D printing is cheap simple non critical part=Shapeways or Prometal. italic Difficult end part expertise pushing the envelope large scale manufacturing high volume manufacturing automotive or medical=FIT FKM 3D RPT Prometal Materialise Fcubic Layerwise or CRP. italic This list is not exhaustive since I don't have any experience with many undoubtedly excellent service bureaus out there but in my opinion these are the best 3D printing services bar none. If you do order from one of these do please say that I rmended them I'm looking to make a metal 3D printed watch band and case and could use the additional discount. italic Also there are also other SLS technologies and machines out there such as 3D Systems Sinterstations and sPro machines but at the risk of bing the only person working in 3D printing without a email address I prefer EOS because it is better and makes for higher definition and prettier parts). italic Issues with production nAnother issue to consider would be with the flexibility of the standard polyamide (PA) material used with SLS. This would mean that your part might sag under its own weight and not look very nice. Perhaps it would be possible to make it with PA but this would again depend on the wall thicknesses you need in order to print all the branches which would determine the size of part needed. A very big version of this would sag but if it would be smaller it will work. The service bureau should have people that can predict this for you. If the part might sag you could use Alumide a much stiffer material that is made by mixing the PA powder with aluminum powder. This should give it a nice space aged look. EOS CarbonMide is another possibility and would look awesome and GF or glass filled PA is also possible as is PEEK. These all will give a much higher stiffness to the final part than regular PA. Cost might be eye wateringingly wonderful for something to keep on your desk but then again I don't know how expensive your desk is. I also can't really predict price based on the image. It might be OK but an upload and some email correspondence with a service bureau will give you a definitive answer. Here are some movies that ex the technologyn n