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FAQ

How can I convert a PDF to Word?
There is no good way to use Microsoft Word to edit PDFs. Microsoft Word is used for authoring an original document not modifying a portable document. True Word can import some data from a PDF. That feature is useful when you are authoring a new document and wish to salvage data from a PDF to prevent time spent entering data. In that case it is best to import the PDF into a file by itself and strip it of formatting then copy and paste it into your pre-formatted document as Normal . Then you will proceed to make other formatting changes for headings section numbering etc. If you must edit a PDF directly your edits should be minor. Even in Adobe Acrobat DC Pro you are limited in how much editing you can do. Fix a misspelled word maybe replace a word here or there. If you try to rearrange a document or make edits that cause significant changes regarding allocated space you will not get what you expect. The way flows in a PDF is not always what you expect so shortening or lengthening paragraphs will give strange results oftentimes. PDF editors are not page layout programs. So if your edits are minor and you must edit the of an existing PDF get your hands on a PDF editor (not free). If you can get away with obscuring existing and s you just need good annotation capability. If you have a Mac you can use Preview to annotate or cut and paste graphics. The free Acrobat Reader allows some annotations too. You can use annotations to white-out a section of and put in new annotation to replace it. If you are careful it may not be that noticeable. You can white-out s to alter graphics. You can create a Frankenstein Monster of a document if you like using free PDF annotation software. But then youll ask yourself why you didn just make a whole new document in Microsoft Word something you could call your own.
Is there a site/app/software from where we can convert PDF files into eBooks?
Original Question Which is the best PDF to ebook converter site and app? By far the best ebook format converter editor and reader Ivee across is Calibre freely downloadable from calibre - E-book management s . It converts between PDFs and all the major ebook formats with just a couple of clicks.
Is the Google G1 a good phone?
The good Android interface; responsive touchscreen; HSDPA (); Wi-Fi; QWERTY keypad. The bad Could look better; lack of headphone jack; lack of video recording; lack of stereo Bluetooth. The bottom line While we're not in love with the design and would have liked some additional features the real beauty of the T-Mobile G1 is the Google Android platform as it has the potential to make smartphones more personal and powerful. That said it's not quite there yet so for now the G1 is best suited for early adopters and gadget hounds rather than consumers and business users. Editor's note Sept. 21 218 I remember the meeting well. Over a dozen of us crammed into a conference room. Someone feverishly scratched a dry-erase marker on a corporate-size whiteboard as we puzzled over what Google's new phone would be and how the hell we were going to cover it. Would it be called the Google Phone or the G Phone? Turns out the HTC Dream better known in the US as the T-Mobile G1 was neither. (The HTC Dream debuted Sept. 23 28 followed in the US by the T-Mobile G1 on Oct. 2 28.) Google's vision for a smartphone was so significant and so shocking because its phone wasn't a phone at all. Not like a BlackBerry Palm Treo or even the original iPhone. It was a platform. Android on the G1 rivaled Apple's iPhone software italic but Google didn't give a lick about owning the hardware. It worked with partners -- starting with HTC here -- to create phones in a range of sizes and prices. The important part was for Google to back the G1's hardware with its gold-standard search tool maps with turn-by-turn directions and an Android Market where you could shop for apps. T-Mobile G1 The first Android phone never looked so good See all photos s +46 More s Looking back the HTC Dream G1 was a clunky clumsy ungainly little thing with a jutted-out chin a terribly inconvenient trough of a keyboard and woefully shaky apps. This handset didn't conquer the world all at once not like Apple's tremendous disruption of a staid and exclusive industry. But its legacy as Google's first step into Android domination gives it life and meaning today. Keep reading for Bonnie Cha and Nicole Lee's original T-Mobile G1 review and photos from Oct. 16 28plemented with fresh photos from 218. -Jessica Dolcourt Section Editor Phones horizontal-rule It's been a little more than a year since Google Android s was announced and rumours of a little device called the HTC Dream started to leak onto the Web. The Dream has probably stirred up as much anticipation and hype as the Apple iPhone not only because it would be the first smartphone to run Google's mobile platform but also because of its potential to overtake Apple's darling. The T-Mobile G1 formerly known as the HTC Dream will be available through T-Mobile on Oct. 3 in black or white and will be offered on two tariffs. The Combi tariff offers you a free T-Mobile G1 with 8 minutes unlimited s and unlimited mobile Internet browsing for a total of ua34 a month. On the Flext tariff you get a free T-Mobile G1 with web'n'walk for just ua34 per month including unlimited mobile Internet browsing and up to 125 minutes or up to 25 s or any mix of the two. Design The T-Mobile G1 is manufactured by HTC and has a similar look and feel to thepany's other Pocket PC smartphones such as the HTC TyTN II s and the HTC Touch Pro . The G1 hides a slide-out QWERTY Lang Measuring 117 mm tall by 53 mm wide by 15 mm deep and weighing 159 grams the G1 is definitely not the sleekest device and we certainly wouldn't call it sexy. Instead the words interesting and weirde to mind mostly because the bottom section of the phone juts out at a slight angle. In a battle of pure looks the iPhone would win hands down. That said the G1 has a solid construction and features a soft-touch finish on the back with a rubberlike ure making it easy to grip andfortable to hold. Also there's a good reason for G1's larger size a full Qwerty keyboard. There are a number of users who are reluctant to switch to a full touchscreen smartphone because of the lack of a tactile keyboard so the G1 is certainly an attractive option for such customers. The T-Mobile G1 isn't the thinnest phone out To access it just push the screen to the right. The sliding mechanism is fairly interesting in that the screen actually swings out slightly to the left before snapping into place. The sliding motion is smooth but after a few days of use we started to notice a creaking sound whenever we nudged the screen -- not good. The keyboard itself is reminiscent of the T-Mobile Sidekick s as many observers pointed out during our review period. That's not necessarily a bad thing since we like the Sidekick's keyboard. The buttons are small but overall the keyboard feels roomy enough and shouldn't give too many users problems. If anything we wish the buttons were raised more -- as is they're set flush with the phone's surface. The bigger issue is that the bottom section of the G1 makes it awkward to hold the phone when typing messages. When you slide open the phone the screen orientation automatically switches from portrait to landscape mode. That's good but the screen doesn't change when you physically rotate the phone in its closed state even though it has a motion sensor. The actual display measures 3.2 inches diagonally and has a 32x48-pixel resolution. It's vibrant and sharp and like the iPhone and RIM BlackBerry Storm the touchscreen is capacitive so it will only respond to the touch of your finger and not your fingernail or other objects like a stylus. The G1 provides haptic feedback but only for certain actions and not with every touch. First you'll feel a slight vibration when performing a long press on an icon. Overall we thought this was fine but there were times when the G1 didn't register our actions so some kind of confirmation would have been nice. Screen resolution hase a long way. And you had to press the tab at the bottom to view your app Lang The T-Mobile G1's interface is generally clean fun and easy to use and we like that you can customize the Home screen with your favorite apps very easily. We would even say that the touchscreen's responsiveness is on a par with that on the iPhone's. But the phone's overall interface isn't as intuitive. For example as with most every other phone dipping into the menu layout every time we wanted to access something can get clunky. Yes it's possible to drag out your favorite applications as shortcuts but that means you need to spend quite a bit of time setting it up. Features Below the display are tactile navigation controls including Talk and End buttons a Home shortcut a back button a trackball navigator and a Menu key. As with the touchscreen the Menu button is conual to the application you're in at the time. For example if you're in the Web browser and press Menu you'll see options to open a new window go to a URL bookmark a page and so on. Android in 28 left and Tew The left spine holds a volume rocker and a microSD expansion slot. To access the latter you have to push the screen open in order to remove the protective cover. On the right side you'll find a camera activation button though you can also press the trackball to take pictures. We actually preferred this method since the dedicated camera key is small. Plus when holding the phone horizontally it's easy to nudge the screen upwards while trying to take a picture. On the bottom of the unit is a mini USB port where you connect the power charger. Sadly this is also your only option for connecting a headset as there's no dedicated headphone jack or otherwise. Disappointingly the G1 doesn't have a standard headphone Yes there's a headset included in the box but you don't get the samefort and quality as you would with a nice pair of headphones. If you want the privilege of using your own 'phones you'll have to spend extra money to buy an adaptor. Last but not least the camera lens -- sans flash self-portrait mirror -- is located on the back. The first smartphone to run the Google Android operating system the T-Mobile G1 delivers a number of basic core functions and tight integration with Google's products including Gmail Google Maps and Google Calendar. Wireless options and multimedia capabilities are also well represented on the G1 but there are some glaring omissions and restrictions that we'll get to later. The quad-band G1 offers speakerphone voice dialing conference calling and speed dial. There's no support for visual voicemail but one great convenience is that if you have Gmail all your contacts will automatically be synchronised to the phone book. For caller ID purposes you can assign a photo to a contact as well as a group ID and one of 33 polyphonic ringtones. There's even a setting to send a contact's phone call directly to voicemail every time. Bluetooth is onboard but the supported profiles are limited to wireless headsets and hands-free kits. As with the iPhone 3G there's no love for stereo Bluetooth or tethering so you can't use it as a modem for your laptop. The latter is a lesser issue for us but if we can't get a headphone jack we'd at least like stereo Bluetooth support. The T-Mobile G1 has a very responsive touchscreen and finger-friendly As an alternative to 3G the G1 has integrated Wi-Fi and it can seamlessly transfer between 3G and accessible Wi-Fi networks. In fact the smartphone's YouTube application will only present videos in high resolution when you're using Wi-Fi and play the low-res version when using the mobile phone network in order to optimize the load times. There's an application in the Android Market called iSkoot for Skype which allows you to make Skype calls via the phone's radio rather than Wi-Fi but we imagine there will be VoIP clients added to the database. There's also a wireless manager under the Settings menu where you can turn on and off all the radios and setup connections. To save battery life you can turn off 3G and revert to GPRS network -- a good idea if you don't need to surf the Web or download apps or music. The T-Mobile G1 uses Webkit as the basis for its browser which is also the core of the Safari browser on the iPhone. It uses full HTML browsing and has Java support plus you can surf almost every Web site -- except ones that use Flash. The G1's Web browser is very similar to the iPhone's an allows you to view full Web pages and zoom in and out of You can pan across the screen with your finger and though you can't zoom in by pinching as you can on the iPhone you can bring up onscreen zoom controls at the bottom of the display. Similar to the iPhone you can also double-tap on a Web page to zoom in on a particular section. Of course you're not limited to the touchscreen when navigating the browser. In fact we preferred the trackball for scrolling around pages. You can also tab between multiple browser windows and we like that the browser settings are easily accessible. As with the iPhone you can view the browser in both portrait and landscape modes. There are a few hiccups with the G1 browser that keep it from being a totally seamless experience however. For example we didn't like having to go in and out of the browser menu to do basic navigations such as Back and Forward. Yes there are keyboard shortcuts for these functions but we don't want to have to remember them all the time. And even though we like having the physical Qwerty keyboard an onscreen one would make entering while holding the phone vertically much more convenient. Also the G1's smaller display makes browsing more troublesome than on the iPhone. For all your app needs Google has set up an app store called Android While the interface for the browser leaves a bit to be desired we do like that it has so many customizable settings. You can tweak size block pop-up windows turn off s 529 94 master_ s zoomable s 75 94 master_ s zoomable s 529 94 master_ s zoomable s and audio were synchronised it was blurry -- but then again we were watching low-res versions since we were on T-Mobile's network instead of on Wi-Fi. The camera beats the iPhone's 2-megapixel camera but you can't record video. Worse there are no camera settings such as white balance effects and shooting modes. And taking pictures was a challenge. You have to have a steady hand to get a clear shot as the slightest movement will result in a blurry s also had a yellowish hue. Performance Call quality was good and we enjoyed good sound with minimal background noise though audio was blown out when we set volume to the highest level. Unfortunately the speakerphone wasn't as pristine. On our end the voices sounded tinny and garbled at times; meanwhile our callers said that we sounded far away. The G1 is slightly larger than the iPhone 3G and not as attractive in our We were impressed by the snappy responsiveness during our testing period and were happy not to experience any system freezes or crashes. The T-Mobile G1 has a rated talk time of 5 hours and up to five days of standby time. On an average day of using the phone Web GPS and multimedia applications we noticed that the battery life dropped anywhere from 4 to 5 percent. Conclusion Despite ourts we dide away impressed with the Google Android operating system. There's huge potential for the G1 (and any Android devices that follow) to be powerful minputers as developers create more applications for the open platform. But still the G1 doesn't quite offer the mass appeal and ease of use as the iPhone so it won't be a good fit for someone making the jump from a regular mobile to their first smartphone. Power business users also might want to hold off until more corporate support and productivity applications are added. We'd say the T-Mobile G1 is best-suited for early adopters and gadget hounds who love tinkering around and modding their devices.